People in galleries…

People in galleries...

People in galleries…

Once upon a time, it was verboten to take photos in galleries. Now of course, most allow cameras (without flash). It’s so easy to just photograph everything in sight rather than contemplating the art itself. That’s the trouble with technology generally I suppose, as it can take over at the expense of the life experience.

I like taking a few shots of artwork in context – the exhibition space and particularly in the company of gallery goers. People in galleries hold a special attraction. The viewed and the viewer. Often incidental, arbitrary, perhaps distracted and always interesting. Here are a few of my favorite gallery snaps.

I took this shot recently at our National gallery, in front of Barnett Newman’s "Voice of fire" and for evident reasons. Art meets design, we all carry a little art with us.

I took this shot recently at our National gallery, in front of Barnett Newman’s “Voice of fire” and for evident reasons. Art meets design, we all carry a little art with us.

I’m always fascinated when gallery viewers seem unaware of the artwork and with all of today’s technology, it’s so easy to be somewhere else:

At this point in New York’s Metropolitan, Jackson Pollock’s "Autumn Rhythm (Number 30)" was not the main attraction.

At this point in New York’s Metropolitan, Jackson Pollock’s “Autumn Rhythm (Number 30)” was not the main attraction.

Here’s another momentarily unloved painting, Théodore Rousseau's "The Forest in Winter at Sunset". Rousseau worked on this monumental,unfinished work throughout his career. This painting defies presence on a small screen, however is wonderfully moving in person.

Here’s another momentarily unloved painting, Théodore Rousseau’s “The Forest in Winter at Sunset”. Rousseau worked on this monumental, unfinished work throughout his career. This painting defies presence on a small screen, however is wonderfully moving in person.

The last time I went to New York’s MOMA was on a free-entry Friday night – it was the only space in our schedule. On Friday night the MOMA is a zoo. The noise level is incredible and Friday nighters casually swarm, perhaps as a prelude to late night activities.

It’s often tricky to even get a clear view as with Van Gogh’s "The Starry Night".

It’s often tricky to even get a clear view as with Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night”.

The scale of paintings is something that always surprises – impossible to adequately convey on a website or in a book.

At the MOMA again, Henri Rousseau’s "The Dream" is imposing in a way all the wall posters could never be.

At the MOMA again, Henri Rousseau’s “The Dream” is imposing in a way all the wall posters could never be.

 

Somehow I always associate Dali with larger gallery-sized works. In fact, he completed some monumental pieces. Here's his smaller gems at the MOMA the famous "The Persistence of Memory".

Somehow I always associate Dali with larger gallery-sized works. In fact, he completed some monumental pieces. Here’s one of his his smaller gems at the MOMA, the famous “The Persistence of Memory”.

Finally a prerequisite selfie!

Finally a prerequisite selfie!

This one at the Metropolitan, with John Singer Sargent’s “Madame X”, the subject of my previous blog posting: Sargent and that profile

2 thoughts on “People in galleries…

  1. Really interesting piece, David. And I agree books can’t begin to do justice to paintings. One must come upon a piece and be stunned by it to truly appreciate its power.

    • Great to hear from you Janet, Glad that you liked the post and I’ll certainly be taking a few more snaps in the future! Paintings need to be seen eh…I sometimes linger the other side of the gallery, perhaps with quite an oblique view… as if to catch the art unaware. Try that with a book or computer! Best..David

Comments are closed.